Speckyboy Design Magazine » Color http://speckyboy.com Web Design News, Resources & Inspiration Mon, 28 Jul 2014 14:58:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 50 Websites with Fantastic Color Schemes http://speckyboy.com/2012/11/08/50-websites-with-fantastic-color-schemes/ http://speckyboy.com/2012/11/08/50-websites-with-fantastic-color-schemes/#comments Thu, 08 Nov 2012 07:59:38 +0000 http://speckyboy.com/?p=27345

A fantastic color scheme can make or break a website. It’s got to be good looking, fitting, and appeal to the site’s users. At the same time it must not be distracting, or impede the...


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A fantastic color scheme can make or break a website. It’s got to be good looking, fitting, and appeal to the site’s users. At the same time it must not be distracting, or impede the users ability to view the page.

The websites that we highlight in this article have color schemes that do all that and more. They are truly great uses of color scheme to produce creative and beautiful websites that users love to look at almost as much as they love to use.

Daniel Sitek

The Daniel Sitek homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Trinity Web Tech

The Trinity Web Tech has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Ryan Keiser

The Ryan Keiser homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

We are Impero

The We are Impero has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Hitmo

The Hitmo homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Volll

The Volll has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Nybble Designs

The Nybble Designs homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Melon Free

The Melon Free has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Skittles

The Skittles homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Bronco

The Bronco has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Reel Effect

The Reel Effect homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Codes Lingers Challenge

The Codes Lingers Challenge has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Aruns Folio

The Aruns Folio homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Fuel Brand Inc.

The Fuel Brand Inc. has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Shady Acres

The Shady Acres homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Odo Pod

The Odo Pod has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

HD Live

The HD Live homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Ergpa

The Ergpa has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Mike Poss

The Mike Poss homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Envato

The Envato has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

365 Days Astronomy

The 365 Days Astronomy homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Strutta

The Strutta has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Mary Land Security

The Mary Land Security homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Alessandro

The Alessandro has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Pane Fly

The Pane Fly homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Florida Flourish

The Florida Flourish has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Daguia

The Daguia homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Red Bowl Challenge

The Red Bowl Challenge has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Aaugh

The Aaugh homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Jovi

The Jovi has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Future of Car Sharing

The Future of Car Sharing homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

The Rissington Podcast

The The Rissington Podcast has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Dreamer Apps

The Dreamer Apps homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Kodu Digital

The Kodu Digital has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

The Teasr

The The Teasr homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Feed Stitch

The Feed Stitch has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

F5

The F5 homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Arvorecer

The Arvorecer has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Will Portfolio

The Will Portfolio homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Art 4 Web

The Art 4 Web has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

The Neighborhood

The The Neighborhood homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Glupro

The Glupro has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Colour Pixel

The Colour Pixel homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Logo Cranium

The Logo Cranium has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Clear Left

The Clear Left homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Jay Hollywood

The Jay Hollywood has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Blue Pixel

The Blue Pixel homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Analog

The Analog has an amazing color scheme for inspiration

Puma

The Puma homepage web design with a fantastic color scheme

Abrigo

The Abrigo has an amazing color scheme for inspiration


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What Your Ecommerce Store Colors Says About You http://speckyboy.com/2012/10/11/what-your-ecommerce-store-colors-says-about-you/ http://speckyboy.com/2012/10/11/what-your-ecommerce-store-colors-says-about-you/#comments Thu, 11 Oct 2012 08:02:37 +0000 http://speckyboy.com/?p=28552

Your ecommerce store color scheme can speak volumes about your products and you as a company and affect the way visitors shop on your site. When it comes to something as important as making sales,...


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Your ecommerce store color scheme can speak volumes about your products and you as a company and affect the way visitors shop on your site. When it comes to something as important as making sales, you really want to pick the right colors.

Whether we realize it or not, colors have the power to evoke certain emotions. That is why designers use certain colors for certain projects. So whether you’re launching a brand new ecommerce store, looking to rebrand, or just after some insider tips; you’ve come to the right place.

We all know that there is a certain psychology behind different colors, and that in different cultures they symbolize different things. The same is said for those used in ecommerce website design.

Color is one of the most powerful elements of your design. Before usability, before content, and even before great products; people will see and feel your color scheme. And though not entirely universal in the meanings, it can have a huge impact.

Let’s take a look at some of the main primary and secondary colors. What do they mean to Western web users, and what message are you putting across..:

The Color Red in Web Design

Red has multiple meanings. It can represent danger, anger, or romance. It is a high energy color that reflects urgency, which is often why it is used to symbolize sales and mark downs. It is bold, brash, and catches the eye.

Good Examples of Red in Use:

Grenson as an example of the color Red ecommerce store color web design

Desina as an example of the color Red in use in web design

The Color Orange in Web Design

Orange is another color that can evoke different emotions depending on how it is used. It can be an energetic color, symbolize happiness, or even vitality. Orange is often used to create a ‘Buy it Now’ call to action.

Good Examples of Orange in Use:

Talking Donkeys as an example of the color Orange ecommerce store color web design

Von Dutch as an example of the color Orange in use in web design

The Color Yellow in Web Design

Youthful and optimistic, yellow is a color that sometimes doesn’t translate very well on the web. But vibrant tones of this color can make your ecommerce store look fresh and grab your audiences’ attention. The negative connotation of yellow in ecommerce design is that it can sometimes be seen as a deceitful color.

Good Examples of Yellow in Use:

Van Moof as an example of the color Yellow ecommerce store color web design

Style & Conscience as an example of the color Yellow in use in web design

The Color Green in Web Design

Green is a color with so many connotations, especially in web design. It can symbolize nature when used for beauty products, or can be a symbol of wealth. It is one of the easiest colors for the eye to process which is perhaps why it is so widely used.

Good Examples of Green in Use:

absinthes as an example of the color Green ecommerce store color web design

Made in 33 as an example of the color Green in use in web design

The Color Blue in Web Design

Calm and cool, shades of blue are often used to create a sensation of trust and brand loyalty. Many businesses and banks for example, use blue in their web design. In terms of ecommerce, trust is a certainly important; especially as customers are handing over card details.

Good Examples of Blue in Use:

Helvetitee as an example of the color Blue ecommerce store color web design

Evoke as an example of the color Blue in use in web design

The Color Purple in Web Design

Shades of purple are used to reflect different things in design. Purple is often associated with royalty and affluence, so is used by ecommerce stores to look more ‘high brow’. It is also used in the world of retail and beauty to soothe and calm, which is often why it is featured on anti-aging products.

Good Examples of Purple in Use:

My Wine Box as an example of the color Purple ecommerce store color web design

DeFrae as an example of the color Purple in use in web design

The Color Pink in Web Design

Youthful, fun, and exciting; pink can symbolize a whole host of emotions. It is often used in ecommerce stores aimed at young women and mothers. It is romantic and feminine so has a very clear target market in mind.

Good Examples of Pink in Use:

Heart Breaker Fashion as an example of the color Pink in use in web design

 as an example of the color Pink in use in web design

The Color White in Web Design

On to the neural colors now, and white is an interesting choice for an ecommerce store. It reflects purity and cleanliness. Designers talk of using ‘white space’ to enhance their work. This color is fresh, open, ad inviting making it a great choice for an ecommerce website.

Good Examples of White in Use:

S.E.H. Kelly as an example of the color  White in use in web design

7 Diamonds as an example of the color White in use in web design

The Color Black in Web Design

Much like red, black can symbolism a number of things – especially in an ecommerce store. It is often seen as a powerful, strong color; one that is used for luxury products. But on the negative side it can seem void of emotion and even symbolize death. This is perhaps a color you should be using sparingly on your store.

Good Examples of Black in Use:

Cross Fit as an example of the color Black in use in web design

Hiut Denim as an example of the color Black in use in web design

The Color Grey in Web Design

Grey is a neutral color, and one that can seem conservative and formal. Sleek ecommerce stores use this color to show their authority and reflect the high quality of their products. It is mainly used as a background color because it is devoid of any warmth.

Good Examples of Grey in Use:

Hard Graft as an example of the color Grey in use in web design

Twelve Saturdays as an example of the color Grey in use in web design

The Color Brown in Web Design

Dependable, natural and stable; brown is a color that divides designers. Some see it as a dull color to be avoided, while others will capitalize on the fact it can portray you as wholesome and reliable.

Good Examples of Brown in Use:

Zaramama as an example of the color Brown in use in web design

Redington as an example of the color Brown in use in web design

Consumer Behavior and Colors

So we know what these colors mean, but what impact can they – and do they – have on consumer behavior?

Depending on your products, and the type of customer you want to attract, it is possible to appeal to these shoppers. And all through the ecommerce color schemes and variations you employ on your website.

For example, you can appeal to impulse shoppers using reds and oranges, royal blues, and blacks. As we have discussed, these colors showcase a sense of urgency and sales.

If you’re looking to target budget shoppers and tap into the current wave of frugal shoppers, green is the color of choice. The ‘color of money’ shows that your store is great value, without scrimping on quality. Dark and navy blues are also used to attract these buyers.

Finally, ‘traditional’ buyers can be targeted with paler and softer color pallets. Sky blues and shades of pink are traditionally used by clothing retailers, as they give a sense of calm and tranquility.

Final Points

It is surprising how each color can mean something different depending on its context. And that is the important thing to remember.

Your ecommerce store will say different things to different people. How you use the colors, and how you pair them can speak volumes about your company and your products. So next time you visit a website, take a look at its color scheme and see what it’s trying to say.


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Colour Combination Makes a Better Impact in Logo Designing http://speckyboy.com/2012/01/29/colour-combination-makes-a-better-impact-in-logo-designing/ http://speckyboy.com/2012/01/29/colour-combination-makes-a-better-impact-in-logo-designing/#comments Sun, 29 Jan 2012 08:38:53 +0000 http://speckyboy.com/?p=19392

It’s undeniable. Branding is the life blood of any business. Even for small businesses, you’ve gotta build brand identity, or be ready for your company to go belly up. A big part of many company’s...


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It’s undeniable. Branding is the life blood of any business. Even for small businesses, you’ve gotta build brand identity, or be ready for your company to go belly up.
A big part of many company’s brand identity is the logo. It’s like the face of your company. You need one that’s good looking and instantly recognizable. To that end, colour can make a big impact on not just how your logo looks, but as a result how your company’s perceived.
In the following article, we discuss the impact that colour combinations can make in the design of your company’s logo and the power that logo’s going to have for your brand.

How Colour Combination Makes a Better Impact in Logo Designing

Any person who owns a small business or is otherwise involved with logo designing should have a crystal clear concept of how colour combination makes a better impact in logo designing. The logo of a company is a big part of what attracts customers to its products. Thus, since a simple logo can decide the fate of a business or its popularity, every aspect of the design should be carefully explored. Especially, how the colour combination makes a better impact on the logo.

Image Source: Paint Dripping Via Shuttershock

Points to be Kept in Mind While determining How Colour Combination Makes a Better Impact in Logo Design:

Before we shift to how colour combination makes an impact on a logo design we should learn about the other points that must be taken care of before choosing the colour. These are:

Choose the Shape with Care: Who would want a logo that people forget the moment it’s out of sight? If you don’t want this to happen in your case, choose a logo that is simple in design and yet looks fetching. If you complicate it too much, chances are your customers won’t be able to figure out the message you’re sending, thus making your attempts to create a place for your company in their minds with your logo, futile.

An Ideal Logo Should Answer Questions: The moment we see any logo, thoughts like: which company does it belong to? What are they manufacturing? come to mind. So an ideal logo should be able to tell the prospective customer all these things and more.

The Logo Should Remain Constant: Your clothing and shoes may change every year depending on the current fashion trend, but your logo shouldn’t. When people see a logo, they identify the company it represents. If you change your logo every year, you’ll be paving the way for your customer to forget about your company as no one will be able to relate to it any longer.

Last but not least…

How Colour Combination makes a Better Impact: Colours have the capability of inspiring people to think in certain ways without directly spelling it out. For example, white is always the colour of peace and purity, blue paints in our thoughts the picture of a sea while green reminds us of the trees and the nature around us. So these colours, if used intelligently and thoughtfully, can serve the purpose of conveying the message a company wants to just by use of colour.

How Exactly can Colour Affect your Chosen Logo:

Logo without Colour: Colours are definitely one of the most crucial points of logo design. However, to call them the sole important point is flat out incorrect. When one looks at a brightly coloured logo, it may seem to be just what you needed, but before you make the final decision, see how the logo looks in black and white. Remember that in modern times, logos are used in a variety of media and sometimes they may have to be depicted in these two basic shades. So, selecting a logo that is close to illegible and unattractive in them cannot be a good idea.

Image Source: Open Pantone Sample Colors Via Shuttershock

Cost of Colour: The combination of a range of colours may be beautiful to look at, but it definitely isn’t easy on the pocket. Say the logo you’ve picked out has a combination of five to seven colours. It may be visually stunning, but you’ll be spending a lot more every time you print it. It’s not wise to spend that much money on a logo. It’s better to go for a combination of two colours or at most three. Even trying various tints of the same colour is an intelligent choice, as it not only saves money but it’s soothing to the eye as well.

• If people already associate some particular colours with the company or brand that you want to choose a logo for, it’s a good idea to use those colours in the logo. However, if those colours aren’t doing anything for the company, it is better to avoid them.

How Colours Should be Combined in a Logo:

• Bright hues often make a bold statement, so they should be used very carefully.
• Don’t use over-bright colours that hurt the eye.
• Contrasting of colours don’t look good on a logo.
• Dull and boring shades can actually lead the customer to ignore your logo. As a result, your company will be completely ignored as well.
• If your logo contains text, make sure it’s written in dark colours and can be read with ease.
• Every colour tells its own story. Make sure the colours you choose go with the products you’re selling or the message you want to get across. For example, if you’re trying to sell medicine it probably wouldn’t be a great idea to use gray in your logo.

Colours have the power to decide the future of your brand. The impact of colour combination in logo designing is undeniable.


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How many colours are there? http://speckyboy.com/2011/12/22/how-many-colours-are-there/ http://speckyboy.com/2011/12/22/how-many-colours-are-there/#comments Thu, 22 Dec 2011 09:01:18 +0000 http://speckyboy.com/?p=18410

Colour. It’s something that we all use in our web or print work and finding the right colour to highlight, emphasise and stand out from the crowd can be easier said than done. Trying to...


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Colour. It’s something that we all use in our web or print work and finding the right colour to highlight, emphasise and stand out from the crowd can be easier said than done. Trying to make a decision about which hex code to use got me thinking, how many colours are there?

3 or 4?

Depending on whether you work predominantly in web or print your answer might be 3 or 4. Red, green and blue or Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black.

Why 3 or 4?

Well you might have said 3 colours because Red, green and blue are the (additive) primary colours that are output through your TV, mobile and computer monitor. When added and mixed together these primary colours can produce a whole sub-set of different colours, including white in the right intensity.


Printing Press Inks image from Shutterstock.

But then again, you might have gone for 4 colours, particularly if you are a graphic designer primarily producing print work. Colour printers use cyan, magenta, yellow and black to produce countless secondary colours through a range of different printing techniques: halftone, pantone etc.


CMYK Gift Bag on White image from Shutterstock.

RGB or CMYK both produce a sub-set of colours but at their core are made up from 3 or 4 colours.

216 or 256?

If you’re saving as a GIF or a PNG or creating something for screen you might say 216 or 256 web-safe colours.

Why 216 or 256?

You might have started off saying 256 as this is the number of colours in monitors of the time. A 256 colour display. When saving as a GIF you have the option to save with 256 colours, as a GIF is palette based. If you wanted to reduce your file size of your GIF further you might start to reduce the colours used in the palette while trying to retain the quality of the final image. As the web continues to evolve and Internet speeds keep increasing, file sizes of images will become less of an issue, meaning that you can keep your 256 colours in your GIF.

You might also say 216 as while there are 256 colours in the web-safe palette, operating systems reserved some of the colours for their own use resulting in 216. This number is also easily divisible by 6 and so allows for 6 different shades of red, green and blue to create one colour. These 6 different shades, or hexadecimal, can be used in HTML either through the hex code or through the different RGB values.


Open Pantone Sample Colors image from Shutterstock.

Too many to count?

With all the advances in technology we’re moved on from the initial ‘web-safe’ colours and we’re now enjoying far more colourful days in front of our screens, 16 million colours to be precise. 16384 of which most modern monitors are capable of displaying according to the w3c: www.w3schools.com/html/html_colors

Lynda.com summaries the issue of why web-safe colours were first introduced succiently and is credited as creating the web-safe palette. It’s still an interesting and useful read today: www.lynda.com/resources/webpalette

Does it matter?

Well in a nutshell, yes. With some caveats of course!

If you’re designing for screen, colour, and more specifically colour contrast, can play a huge part in making text accessible to people with visual impairments. Your audience might also be based somewhere without our technological advances and be using a basic monitor and browser and using a colour outside of the web-safe 256 might affect your content/design.

If you’re designing for print using black, how do you make sure that you are using black? While all blacks look the same on screen there can be noticeable differences when printing resulting in a different result than expected.

Interestingly while the number of web colours have increased from the initial web-safe palette, the number of print colours have remained the same since the introduction of the modern process. Although Pantone introduced their Hexachrome system, within recent years, adding orange and green to turn CMYK into CMYKOG.

It’s a colourful life


Color Pencils image from Shutterstock.

At the end of the day it’s a colourful life and there are plenty of resources out there to make life easier for us such as: www.colorsontheweb.com. But it’s important to use colour wisely, it’s easy to get carried away with an entire rainbow at the end of your mouse but keeping it simple will help focus a user’s attention and not overwhelm or distract from what you really want them to focus on, whether it’s a link, email address or text.

How many colours would you say there are? Is it possible to provide a definite answer? Or does it depend on how, or what, you are creating?


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10 Album Covers for Eye-grabbing Color Scheme Inspiration http://speckyboy.com/2010/11/01/10-album-covers-for-eye-grabbing-color-scheme-inspiration/ http://speckyboy.com/2010/11/01/10-album-covers-for-eye-grabbing-color-scheme-inspiration/#comments Mon, 01 Nov 2010 08:22:32 +0000 http://speckyboy.com/?p=8706

A great color scheme can really make your visual design stand out. Often times the difference between an eye-grabbing design and a bland one is the color combination. The same layout of shapes and text,...


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A great color scheme can really make your visual design stand out. Often times the difference between an eye-grabbing design and a bland one is the color combination. The same layout of shapes and text, when paired with the right color scheme, can go from drab to fab (wow that was corny).

There are certain trusted color combinations that many designers go to: red and blue, yellow and green, black and white. They work, but they’re overused. If you want your visual design to stand out, you need to start exploring more adventurous color combinations. But rather than relying on trial and error, you can simply look to already-effective designs. And album covers are a great source of color scheme inspiration.

color-combinations

The following 10 album covers all use fairly non-standard color schemes. The layout of these covers might even be pretty standard, but what makes them stand out is the color combinations. Further proof of just how much of a difference the right color scheme can make.

So here are 10 album covers for eye-grabbing color scheme inspiration:

1. Autechre – Garbage

Autechre - Garbage

Colors: blue + brown

This is perhaps the epitome of an unconventional color scheme. Blue and red, blue and orange – those are the typical choices. But blue and brown? Usually, brown only works with green, to give a natural tree-like vibe. Yet, it works great here, and it turns what would normally be a typical futuristic/glitchy design into something more unique.

2. The Clash – London Calling

The Clash - London Calling

Colors: pink + green + grey

The pink and green evoke a watermelon. So if you want your visual design to be sweet and tasty, pink and green is a lighter, more unconventional twist on the more typical red and green color scheme. And the grey makes the color scheme lighter than if you were to use a black background.

3. Clipse – Till the Casket Drops

Clipse - Till the Casket Drops

Colors: Red + pink

You’d think that using slightly different shades of the same color would make for an ugly color scheme. Yet this design shows that it surprisingly works, especially with a bright, fire-y color like red. The shades of red and pink are just different enough to stand out from each other, and by using them exclusively you end up with an intense color scheme.

4. Elvis Presley – Elvis Presley

Elvis Presley

Colors: pink + green + grey

The album cover that inspired The Clash’s London Calling. Not much extra to say, other than it’s further proof that pink and green go well together with a grey background, providing a sweet and tasty color scheme.

5. Gatecrasher – Disco-Tech

Gatecrasher - Disco-Tech

Colors: yellow + pink + white

The yellow and pink combination gives a bold, sugar-y vibe that’s not too feminine and not too masculine. The white gives a lighter, almost candy-like feel that wouldn’t be there if you used a black background instead.

6. The Orb – Live 93

The Orb - Live 93

Colors: Yellow + blue-yellow

On paper, yellow and blue-yellow seems like it’d be disorienting. Yet, similar to the red and pink combination earlier, it works in an intense way. Specifically, it gives a biotech, future-industrial energy. Something you couldn’t get if you used safer color combinations like blue and grey or even blue and yellow.

7. Prefuse 73 – Vocal Studies + Uprock Narratives

Prefuse 73 - Vocal Studies + Uprock Narratives

Colors: blue + brown + black & white

Similar to Autechre’s Garbage, this design uses blue and brown in a really effective way. Futuristic yet more unique. And with the inclusion of black and white, the color scheme becomes more classic as well. Like a fusion of futurism and a ye old novel.

8. Roots Manuva – Slime and Reason

Roots Manuva - Slime and Reason

Colors: grey + black + green

The grey and black is a standard yet effective grayscale color combination. It can give the feel of something classic and mysterious. Just look at all the black and white photos and noir films. And that’s what this album cover evokes – the head sculpture is elegant yet brooding. But the green is what makes this color scheme eye-grabbing, providing a certain toxic touch to an otherwise standard color combination.

9. The Sex Pistols – Never Mind the Bollocks

The Sex Pistols - Never Mind the Bollocks

Colors: pink + green + black

A similar color scheme to both the Clash and Elvis covers. But by making pink the background and using black instead of gray, the sweet and tasty vibe is perverted into something more intense. Like, it’s going to be fun, but it’s also going to be in-your-face and maybe even a little bit nasty. Which is what The Sex Pistols were. A great example of not only using a more unconventional color scheme, but twisting it into something that the original color combination did not intend.

10. The Sex Pistols – Never Mind the Bollocks (Version 2)

The Sex Pistols - Never Mind the Bollocks

Colors: pink + yellow + black

An alternate take on the Pistols cover. By placing the pink as the secondary player to the yellow background, the color scheme goes from sweet-yet-twisted to much more loud and even more in-your-face. Unlike the Gatecrasher design, black is used here instead of white. That tilts the scale to be much more masculine than feminine. Yet another great example of perverting an unconventional color combination to be even more unique: a pink and yellow-based color scheme that’s menacing and testosterone-fueled.

Eye-grabbing Color Scheme Inspiration

Hopefully these 10 album covers have given you some eye-grabbing color scheme inspiration. There are plenty more unconventional-colored album covers and visual designs, but these ones can help you start exploring and using more adventurous color schemes for your designs.

Your turn: where else have you been inspired by or looked to for eye-grabbing color schemes?


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