20 Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

In this post we share some amazing examples of conformal photography.

Definition for Conformal Mapping from Wikipedia: “(mathematics) A mapping, between points of one coordinate system and another, in which the angles of intersection between pairs of curves are preserved”. (I am still none the wiser!)

Eternal Scream

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

Double Spiral

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

It might be conformal, it sure is ugly

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

The Fear Inside of Me is Just Me

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

Riefler clock_mathmapped

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

Impossible Bookcase

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

In the Room

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

The George in Rye courtyard

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

Noodle Bowl, Droste Style

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

Clock 02 : Time Travel

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

mmlog

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

I am telling you, it is not straight

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

Can I give you a…

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

Infinite Gear Ratio

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

Infinite Giraffe Teapot

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

G35 Wheel

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

Pentinfinite Time Spiral

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

Circular Saw

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

Spiraling Frame

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

Radar Detector Required

Amazing Examples of Conformal Photography

(652 Posts)

Paul Andrew

Paul is the founder and editor of Speckyboy Design Magazine. He has many years experience within the web design industry and a passion for the latest web technologies and design trends. He lives in the small town of Inverness in the north of Scotland. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook or Google+.

Comments

  • good work …

  • Mohsin22ali

    very nice graphics

  • You mean there isn’t an automatic ‘spiral’ tool in Photoshop?! :P

  • Hassanabbas198

    commendabale job

  • Mark Joseph De Luna

    This is really awesome. Keep up the good work..You really twisted my mind nevertheless you opened up my senses

  • Amazing gallery !!!!

  • Nate Hall

    Since nobody else has an answer for how
    these are made or what it involves I shall attempt to try. I’ll start
    with a question. What is the square root of negative one? Since there
    is no ordinary number that can solve negative roots, Girolamo
    Cardano, in
    1539, simply made up
    a new kind of number that could . The great mathematician Descartes
    had so much disdain for the idea he derisively called these invented
    numbers “imaginary”. The name stuck.

    So where does one find an “Imaginary
    number” on a number line? You don’t! You have to use a plane
    instead, where the y axis is the imaginary part. An imaginary number
    plus a real number is called a complex number and is plotted onto
    this “complex plane”.

    Here is how you get these neat photos.
    You take a function, like say f(x)=x+4 and apply it to the numbers
    that represent the points on your computer that describe where a
    point of color sits. You represent a point as part real, “x” and
    part imaginary “y”. You then use the function to generate a new
    set of points. The point (5,6) in my example becomes (9,6). With this
    particular function the picture you generate is a picture that simply
    moves all the pixels to the right by 4. That’s the mapping part.
    Conformal mapping is a kind of mapping where certain properties don’t
    change , like the angles between lines. It’s complicated functions
    that generate the neat pictures, like f(z)=e^z. (It’s standard to
    refer to a complex number function with a “z” instead of “x”).

    Want to make some? You need the free
    software called “Gimp” and an addition to it called “mathmap”
    . I’m afraid it’s not as simple to get “mathmap” working as it
    use to be. I had to do a bunch of tweaking to get it to work but it
    might be easier now.