10 Modern Examples of Slide-Out Sidebars

By on CSS, JavaScript

There was a time when the only place for a navigation menu was on the top of the page. There was also a time when the menu lived within the left or right column (preferably the left one). Then, an era of slide-out sidebars came, and suddenly it all made sense. We have finally found the last piece of the puzzle.

Sidebars have become an integral part of website design. Along with the hamburger menu, they play an essential role in the formation of mobile-friendly interfaces without which we can’t survive these days.

You have to admit, the slide-out sidebar is one of the best solutions when you need to create a design that needs to look good on both extra-large and ultra-small screens. It is a compromise that provides us with lots of opportunity for experimentation, to say nothing about providing the extra space we lack on mobile devices. You can place all the necessary stuff inside without sacrifice.

The same goes for large desktop screens. The reason is simple: everyone is looking to make a great first impression. And with all of those extravagant technologies that let you reach for the stars, it feels like the more room you have for allowing your imagination to run wild, the better.

Therefore, slide-out sidebars are valuable tools. And some helpful code snippets that give you a perfect base for creating your own are a welcome addition to your toolkit. Today, we have rounded up some helpful solutions for incorporating these sidebars into your next project.

Sidebar template by azouaoui Mohamed

Sidebar template by Azouaoui Mohamed can easily become the solution to all of your problems. It already has all the necessary elements that you need, starting with the logotype and ending with the social media icons and search. It is a fully-functional panel that looks great on both in mobile and desktop screens. Based on one of the most popular and powerful frameworks out there, Bootstrap 4, it will run like clockwork.

Pure CSS Sidebar by Jelena Jovanovic

If you need something less sophisticated than the previous example, then we recommend you to take a look at Pure CSS Sidebar by Jelena Jovanovic.

Jelena has come up with an elegant, yet simple sidebar that is suitable for numerous projects. It smoothly slides out from the left side and includes just the vital details such as navigation and a logo. The best part is that everything is done using pure CSS. So, if you are a fan of creating elements without JavaScript, then this one is certainly worthy of your attention.

Flexbox Off Canvas Menu by OK

Much like in the previous example, here everything is done with CSS. However, this time the author has opted in favor of one of the most promising CSS features: Flexbox. The sidebar has a neutral design and gives you an opportunity to add all of your navigational links. It is a quick solution for many common problems.

sidebar/navbar with ARIA support by Ferran Buireu

Ultra-narrow sidebars have made a recent comeback, reminding us that they are still quite useful. Despite their size, they are able to cover all of the essentials. Note how the author managed to place both a logotype and small icon-based menu without much effort. He has also added ARIA support. This is indeed a valid solution.

CSS sidebar toggle by Silvestar Bistrović

Here is another modern sidebar in our collection that is increasingly popular among developers. While all of the previously-mentioned solutions feature just a narrow panel, this one occupies the entire screen – providing you with a great deal of space. It has a beautiful design and smooth slide-out effect.

Responsive sidebar by Antonija Šimić

For those who are sick and tired of left-sided concepts, we have found you one that opens from the right. Though, with a little effort, you can quickly change the orientation of all the above examples. However, if you need a ready-to-go solution, then Antonija Šimic shares one with you. It is simple, minimal with a nice modest design. And most importantly it is responsive – that is a must-have for every project these days.

Off-canvas sidebar menu by Devilish Alchemist

While we have mainly concentrated on basic slide-out functionality, sometimes we all have a hankering for getting away from the ordinary. Devilish Alchemist shows us how to do that without overwhelming the audience and reinventing the wheel. This off-canvas sidebar menu opens from the right side, yet it has a triangle shape, and all of the elements are placed at the bottom. It is an interesting solution with a playful interaction that won’t leave your audience indifferent.

Elastic SVG Sidebar Material Design by Nikolay Talanov

Much like the previous artist, Nikolay Talanov has decided to make things a bit interesting by turning the banal mobile slide-out menu into an engaging piece with responsive interaction. He has come up with an elastic SVG sidebar that forces every onlooker to stop by and play around.

Sidebar slide-in-out effect by Mari Johannessen

Last, but not least. If you don’t need all of those pre-made solutions and you seek a solid base for your experiments, then Mari’s take on the sidebar is precisely what you need. Her snippet will please you with its simplicity and purity. There is nothing fancy inside – just a simple sidebar with a slide-out effect.

A Flexible Solution

Let’s face it, slide-out sidebars are an integral part of the current web design zeitgeist, much like the hamburger icon that we can see in virtually each and every interface.

They saved the day when we did not know what to do with all of our content on mobile interfaces almost a decade ago. And they still prove today that they are a valid player in the arena.