10 Beautiful Free Themes for Sublime Text

Sublime Text is one of the more popular text and code editors out there – and it’s easy to see why. The app makes life easier for programmers with features like the ability to select multiple instances of the same string (like a PHP variable, for example), powerful search that lets you open up a file and jump to the exact spot you’re looking for and the ability to customize just about everything.

One of those cool customization features comes in the form of themes. There are a variety of free themes available that can change the look of Sublime Text to better reflect your needs. Below is a collection of some of our favorites.

You might also like these Sublime Text WordPress extensions or this Sublime Text cheatsheet.

Dracula

Dracula is a dark theme that presents some great color contrast. Using a dark background actually saves energy as well, so you can be an environmentally conscious vampire. There’s also a chance to expand your dark persona as Dracula is also available to use in over 40 apps.

Dracula

ayu

ayu is a very simple theme for Sublime Text 2/3 that gives you three color options: Dark, Mirage and Light. Regardless of which version you use, colors are bright and the theme makes for easy reading. There are settings for things like displaying a separator between UI panels, font size, tab size and more.

ayu

Boxy

Billed as the most ‘hackable theme’ for Sublime Text 3, Boxy comes in both light and dark variations. Also included are dozens of options to help you customize things to your liking. You can set various sizes, fonts, color accents, icon sets and backgrounds. Plus, change settings for tabs, bars and panels. There is simply a ton of ways to tweak the theme.

Boxy

Spacegray

Spacegray is a set of custom themes for Sublime Text 2/3 that features Base16 color schemes. The look is minimal and comes in three flavors: Spacegray, Spacegray Light and Spacegray Eighties. Settings are available for font, tab and sidebar tweaks.

Spacegray

Material

Material brings Google’s Material Design to Sublime Text 3. It allows you to choose from a number of color schemes and has a configuration panel to make for easy customization. This one is a nice inspiration for those who already use Material Design in their work.

Material

Soda

Soda comes in both light and dark variations and works with both Sublime Text 2 and 3. It’s designed to take advantage of high-dpi displays and also sports alternate tab styles. The look is very sharp and quite easy to read.

Soda

Afterglow

A minimal dark theme for Sublime Text 2/3, Afterglow is actually based on Spacegray – which we covered above. It supports different tab heights, color options, sidebar icons and Markdown syntax. There are lots of options here to make this minimal theme your own.

Afterglow

Gravity

Gravity looks to bring some elements of OS X Yosemite and El Capitan to Sublime Text 3. There are dark and light variations, along with some basic customization options. Overall, the theme will blend in beautifully for Mac users and will at least bring a taste of it to everyone else.

Gravity

Cyanide

Cyanide is a dark, minimal theme that works with Sublime Text 3. There are several color schemes available, including: Monocyanide, Twilightcyanide, Acid, Alert, Golden, Mint and more. You’ll find that many options can be customized via a settings panel.

Cyanide

New Moon

New Moon aims to strike a more balanced tone than some of the very high contrast themes out there. It’s a dark theme and is geared towards web development. It handles HTML, CSS, JS and PHP quite well – without the distraction of bold colors.

New Moon

Simply Sublime

Sublime Text has proven itself to be an outstanding code editor. But it’s the little touches, like themes, that really make it stand out. That level of customization puts it ahead of many competitors.

So, whether you’re already using Sublime Text or looking to make the leap, adding one of the themes above will help bring an even higher comfort level to your development work.

Comments

  • dgw

    Dark themes do not save energy on the most common display type used with PCs today, LCDs. It was true of CRT monitors, and it’s true in the mobile space for devices that use OLED panels (which are entering the ultra high end of PC hardware), but the vast majority of PCs in use right now use fluorescent or LED backlit displays that use more or less the same amount of energy to display a full white screen as a full black screen.

  • karks88

    Stupid me, I didn’t realize that wasn’t still the case! Thanks for the clarification.

  • Ihor Oleksandrov

    Note, Boxy Theme will be deprecated in favor of DA UI: https://packagecontrol.io/packages/DA%20UI