8 Fantastic Onboarding Carousel HTML & CSS Snippets

By on UX Design

Onboarding animations took the web by storm several years ago. They were increasingly popular among designers. The Dribbble community was teeming with different solutions. It started with a simple presentation using static illustrations that charmed with a symbiosis of smart approach and artistic nature. And we ended up with animated pieces that reveal the beauty of a future mobile application in all its glory.

Of course, as is always the case, time passed and the buzz around it gradually died. However, like all strong trends, these onboarding projects have changed their status from something extravagant to a must-have feature.

Everyone who aims to create a professional product, as well as cares about their audience, takes onboarding seriously. In the long run, it plays a vital role in bridging the gap between users and an application. It underlies every good user experience. So it just can’t be overlooked.

For those who are aware of this vital technique and want to exploit the full power hidden inside, we have prepared a collection of onboarding code snippets. They will help you to get started with building a better user experience.

Onboarding by Fabio Ottaviani

Fabio Ottaviani has created an eye-pleasing solution with a neat and clean design, beautiful graphics, and lovely dynamics. It is based on a conventional horizontal slider that offers three tiny dots for navigation. It has three screens, but you are welcome to increase this number. Use it to make onboarding unobtrusive.

See the Pen
DailyUI – #023 Onboarding
by Fabio Ottaviani (@supah)
on CodePen.

Onboarding slides with jquery by Hainer Savimaa

While the previous example takes a more traditional route to onboarding, this project by Hainer Savimaa incorporates some modern features. The split layout rules the roost here, offering carefully-organized space to display the information.

It is convenient as you get an opportunity to separate the visual content from the textual. And, with all of that, look not just good – but trendy. The author has also supplied each section with transition effects that only reinforce the overall impression. Note, along with the classic dot-based navigation, there are also supporting “Next” and “Back” buttons for those who do not like tiny controls.

See the Pen
Onboarding slides with jquery
by Hainer Savimaa (@hainersavimaa)
on CodePen.

Onboarding by Nahom Ebssa

The key feature of Nahom Ebssa’s project lies in its conservative use of space. The artist has managed to accommodate all of the necessary information in one screen and still provide a comfortable user experience. As for navigation, it is a bit unfinished since there is no back button and the navigation dots are just mere decoration. However, on the whole, this code snippet can serve as a sound foundation for your experiments.

See the Pen
Onboarding
by Nahom Ebssa (@enahom99)
on CodePen.

Onboarding by Fersho Pls

Inspired by outstanding onboarding screens created by Ennio Dybeli, this solution will please you with its minimal look and lovely behavior. Although, there is nothing fancy about it. All the details are standard, and the transition is basic, yet they work together perfectly. The concept is simple, yet straight-to-the-point. It is ideal for small-scale projects.

See the Pen
Onboarding
by Fersho Pls (@fershopls)
on CodePen.

Onboarding Carousel by Dario Corsi

We have already seen the split screen in our collection. This time, it was rotated ninety degrees and transformed into a traditional stripe layout – looking pretty much like a basic slider from the past. But beyond a doubt, it has a potential for covering all of the onboarding information that you want to deliver to users.

It comes with two types of navigation. First, a relatively big upper part, for giving the visual material a huge dose of attention. Then there’s a clean area for accompanying text. Also, there are some fantastic animations that you can adapt to your needs.

Even though it has a relatively wide structure – fitting tablets rather than cell phones, you can quickly take the idea and come up with a responsive version.

See the Pen
Onboarding Carousel
by Dario Corsi (@dariocorsi)
on CodePen.

Onboarding by Nick Wanninger

Onboarding by Nick Wanninger is not the kind of thing that wins over users with beautiful aesthetics or extraordinary animation. Rather, it serves as a base for experiments. It does not have a fancy design – just a classic structure. There are two areas. The first one is allocated for the content, whereas the second one embraces navigation.

Unlike the previously mentioned snippets, this component ships with short lines instead of dots and standard arrows instead of the words “Next” and “Back”, resulting in an intuitive interface. Much like the code snippet of Dario Corsi, it plays the role of a perfect foundation that is ready to be dolled up.

See the Pen
Onboarding
by Nick Wanninger (@nickwanninger)
on CodePen.

Mobile carousel by Elena

Created by gifted artist Elena, this is an exact replica of a Dribbble shot from Roland Victor. Though, with one small exception: Elena’s project has an animated counterpart that brings about a marvelous overall impression.

Using one of the most popular, time-proven and intuitive carousels in the wild, Owl Carousel, the artist has managed to pull off this concept. It won’t take much effort to crack the idea and adjust it to your needs.

See the Pen
Mobile carousel
by Elena (@ElenaDi07)
on CodePen.

Android App Onboarding by Mat Swainson

The project by Mat Swainson is for those who seek some old-school vibe. It looks a bit outdated, yet it does its job perfectly well.

What’s more, it has one distinct feature that separates it from the others in our round-up: Here the onboarding has two parts. The first one shows four standard screens that can be used to educate visitors. The second one includes a login form for those who do not need any clarifications and want to get straight to business by pushing the “Skip” button.

See the Pen
Android App Onboarding
by Mat Swainson (@matswainson)
on CodePen.

Liquid Swipe Open Source by Cuberto

We have looked at solutions that provide a base technique for showing a series of screenshots or animations in a row. Liquid Swipe Open Source by Cuberto is a bit different.

It is centered around an outstanding transition effect that perfectly imitates liquid swipe behaviour. It feels so natural that it will be quite difficult to get your hands off the application. It is available in a GitHub repo and requires iOS and Xcode.

Liquid Swipe Open Source by Cuberto

Improving the User Experience, Simply

In essence, onboarding can be realized on the basis of a typical carousel that is quite intuitive to use. All you need to do is divide each slide into two parts: One for content, and the other for navigation.

After that, you can enrich it with design features, animations, and transition effects to make the user experience not just informative, but also enjoyable as well.